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Breaking News in Advertising, Media and Technology

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    CANNES, France—The Innovation jury at the Cannes Lions festival tonight handed out its Grand Prix to a fascinating effort to create a global grid of 57 trillion three-by-three-meter squares and give each one a three-word address, which, when adopted, could ease costly, frustrating, growth-limiting and even life-threatening problems in areas that are poorly addressed.

    The system, called what3words, uses a unique combination of just three words to identify every three-by-three-meter square on the planet. As the U.K.-based group points out, it's far more accurate than a postal address and easier to use than a set of coordinates. Having accurate addresses improves customer experience, delivers business efficiencies, drives growth and helps social and economic development, particularly in developing countries.

    See the case study below, and lots more about the work on the website.

    3 Words To Address The World
    Entrant: What3Words
    London

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

    There were 34 campaigns on the shortlist. Each of them was presented in person to the Innovation jury this week.

    "There was nothing out of the 34 shortlisted that wasn't amazing," said R/GA's Nick Law, who served as jury president. "What was interesting about the Grand Prix winner is that it's already scaled. It's already done algorithmically. That three-meter square where you're sitting has an address in every language. The issue is making sure people know about it."

    Law was optimistic the system would be adopted. "A FedEx or a hospital, once they realize this is a good thing and partner with the creatives on this technology, it's all going to happen," he said.

    The jury embraced what3words even though the problems it intends to solve are somewhat remote for people living in more developed countries.

    "We talked about how hard it was to imagine how profoundly important this was, because we don't live in places where addresses are a problem," said Law. "Among the other things we looked at for the Grand Prix, it was a lot easier to empathize with some of them, as they were a lot closer to our reality."

    In addition to the Grand Prix, the jury handed out seven Innovation Lions. (Unlike most other categories in Cannes, Innovation does not hand out gold, silver and bronze Lions—only Innovation Lions.)

    Two winners came from the U.S., and both were from R/GA: Diagenetix's BioRanger, a handheld biology lab for farmers to test for disease in food or water samples; and Owlet, a pair of connected smart sock that monitor your baby's vital signs.

    Australia won two Innovation Lions as well, joined by China, Singapore and Ecudaor. In addition to R/GA, Grey also won two Lions for work from its Singapore and Ecuador offices.

    See the case studies for all the campaigns below.

    Diagenetix Bioranger
    Entrant: R/GA, New York

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

     
    Owlet Baby Care

    Entrant: R/GA, New York

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

     
    Baidu Kuaisou, Smart Chopsticks

    Entrant: Baidu Online Network Technology
    Beijing

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

     
    Optus, Clever Buoy

    M&C Saatchi
    Sydney, Australia

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

     
    Luxottica, Penny The Pirate

    Entrant: Saatchi & Saatchi
    Sydney, Australia

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

     
    Talwar Bindi, Life Saving Dot

    Entrant: Grey Group Singapore
    Singapore

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

     
    Panasonic, ACH2O

    Maruri Grey
    Guayaquil, Ecuador

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.


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    CANNES, France—A gorgeously cinematic film for Leica by F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi and a hilarious and innovative preroll ad for Geico by The Martin Agency each won a Grand Prix in Film at the Cannes Lions festival here tonight, an odd couple of brilliant executions indeed.

    The Film Lions jury, led by Grey's global creative chief Tor Myhren, was allowed to award one Grand Prix for TV work and one for non-TV work—and they did just that.

    At a press conference Saturday morning, Myhren was effusive about both campaigns. "We were looking from the outset for something new. Really new," he said. "And new can be super scary. New can be a little bit uncomfortable. And I think we actually found that."

    The jury awarded one specific spot, "Family," in Geico's celebrated "Unskippable" preroll campaign from Martin in Richmond, Va., which presented the brand pitch in the first five seconds (i.e., before the "Skip ad" button appears) and then humorously showed characters pretending to be frozen as the action continued around them. "You can't skip this Geico ad because it's already over," the voiceover says.



    The campaign "breaks every single rule of filmmaking," Myhren said. "Instead of begging you to watch this ad, they challenge you not to watch it. And you can't take your eyes off it. Instead of a long story with a tenuous link to the brand at the end, there's a gigantic logo of the brand in the middle of the screen the entire time. This deceptively simple piece of communication really showed us that film can reinvent the way you look at media—the least sexy medium in the world, which is preroll."

    Meanwhile, the two-minute Leica ad from Brazil, marking the 100th anniversary of the brand's first camera, delightfully and beautifully re-created 35 famous photos of spontaneous moments—celebrating the ability of portable cameras to capture real, unscripted, unposed life.

    Myhren said 19 of the 22 jurors selected Leica for the Grand Prix on the very first vote.

    "This is a nearly perfect piece of filmmaking," he said. "The visual storytelling is unique and stunning. The writing is absolutely amazing. And importantly, it's a category that is challenged right now with cell phones and with photography becoming a little bit less sexy."



    While there was little debate about the TV Grand Prix, there was plenty of discussion regarding the non-TV Grand Prix. Along with Geico, the jurors also strongly considered two other campaigns for the top prize.

    The first was Wieden + Kennedy London's "The Other Side" YouTube film for Honda, in which users can press the R key to switch between two parallel stories about the same man that match up shot for shot—one bright and happy, one dark and dangerous. The other was Leo Burnett's "Like a Girl" campaign for P&G's Always, which aims to turn that phrase from a traditional insult to a message of empowerment.

    But in the end, the Geico work was more formally innovative.

    "Brands have lived in preroll, but they've lived there so boringly," Myhren said. "We've accepted that space as just sucking for so long. We must have watched ['Family'] 20 times, and we laughed every single time. And the brand comes through so strongly."

    In addition to the two Grand Prix, there were 10 gold Lions given out, with five of them going to U.S. agencies. The U.S. also won 13 silver Lions and 18 bronze Lions.

    Check out two lists below: First, all the Grand Prix and gold Lion winners from all over the world, and then all the U.S. Grand Prix, gold, silver and bronze winners.


    —All Grand Prix and Gold Lion Winners in Film

    Leica Gallery São Paulo, "100"
    Entrant: F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi São Paulo
    Production Company: Stink Sao Paulo
    (Grand Prix)

    Geico, "Unskippable: Family Long Form 01"
    Entrant: The Martin Agency, Richmond, Va.
    Production Company: Park Pictures New York
    (Grand Prix)

    Unilever, "Proudly Seeking Pleasure"
    Entrant: Lola Lowe & Partners Madrid
    Production Company: Propaganda Producciones Madrid
    (Gold)

    Diageo, "Made Of Black"
    Entrant: AMV BBDO London / BBDO South Africa Johannesburg
    Production Company: Rogue London
    (Gold)

    Gatorade, "Made In NY"
    Entrant: TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles
    Production Company: Smuggler Los Angeles, Ca
    (Gold)

    Old Spice, "Dadsong"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    Nike Golf, "Ripple"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles / Joint Editorial Portland / The Mill Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    Ikea, "Beds"
    Entrant: Mother London
    Production Company: MJZ London
    (Gold)

    Procter & Gamble, "#LikeAGirl"
    Entrant: Leo Burnett Toronto / Leo Burnett Chicago / Leo Burnett London / Holler London
    Production Company: Chelsea Pictures Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    White House, "Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis: President Barack Obama"
    Entrant: Funny Or Die Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    Beats by Dr. Dre, "The Game Before The Game"
    Entrant: R/GA London
    Production Company: The Sword Fight Los Angeles / Rock Paper Scissors Santa Monica / Brewster Parsons Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    Honda Motor Europe, "The Other Side"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy London
    Production Company: Somesuch London / StinkDigital London
    (Gold)


    —All U.S. Winners in Film:
        
    Geico, "Unskippable: Family Long Form 01"
    Entrant: The Martin Agency Richmond
    Production Company: Park Pictures New York
    (Grand Prix)

    Gatorade, "Made In NY"
    Entrant: TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles
    Production Company: Smuggler Los Angeles, Ca
    (Gold)

    Old Spice, "Dadsong"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    Nike Golf, "Ripple"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles / Joint Editorial Portland / The Mill Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    White House, "Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis: President Barack Obama"
    Entrant: Funny or Die Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    Procter & Gamble, "#LikeAGirl"
    Entrant: Leo Burnett Toronto / Leo Burnett Chicago / Leo Burnett London / Holler London
    Production Company: Chelsea Pictures Los Angeles
    (Gold)

    Mars, "Settle It 30'"
    Entrant: DDB Chicago
    Production Company: MJZ Los Angeles / Cut + Run Santa Monica
    (Silver)

    Mars Chocolate North America/Snickers, "Brady Bunch"
    Entrant: BBDO New York
    Production Company: O Positive New York
    (Silver)

    Heinken USA/Newcastle Brown Ale, "Band of Brands Mega Ad"
    Entrant: Droga5 New York
    Production Company: Caviar Los Angeles
    (Silver)

    Value City Furniture, "Old Table"
    Entrant: Dummy Los Angeles / Translation New York
    Production Company: Dummy Los Angeles
    (Silver)

    Weight Watchers, "If You're Happy"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: Epoch Films Los Angeles
    (Silver)

    Adobe, "Dream On"
    Entrant: Goodby, Silverstein & Partners San Francisco
    Production Company: Elevel Films San Francisco / Rock Paper Scissors Santa Monica
    (Silver)

    HelloFlo, "First Moon Party"
    Entrant: Hayden 5 Media New York
    Production Company: Hayden 5 Media New York
    (Silver)

    Nike, "The Last Game"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: Passion Pictures London
    (Silver)

    Geico, "Unskippable: Family, Elevator, High Five, Cleaning Crew"
    Entrant: The Martin Agency, Richmond, Va.
    Production Company: Park Pictures New York
    (Silver campaign)

    American Greetings, "The World's Toughest Job"
    Entrant: Mullen Lowe, Boston
    Production Company: Caviar Los Angeles
    (Silver)

    Gatorade, "Win From Within: Ben Jackson"
    Entrant: VML Kansas City
    (Silver)

    States United to Prevent Gun Violence, "The Gun Shop "
    Entrant: Grey New York
    Production Company: Rival School Pictures New York / The Mill New York
    (Silver)

    Johnnie Walker, "The Gentleman's Wager"
    Entrant: RSA Films Los Angeles / Anomaly New York
    Production Company: RSA Films Los Angeles
    (Silver)

    Mars Chocolate North America/Twix Bites, "Dial-Up, Flat Top, Y2K"
    Entrant: BBDO New York
    Production Company: Smuggler New York
    (Bronze campaign)

    Old Spice, "Hot Tub, Soccer, Night Club"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: MJZ Los Angeles
    (Bronze campaign)

    Under Armour, "Misty Copeland - I Will What I Want"
    Entrant: Droga5 New York
    Production Company: Reset Santa Monica
    (Bronze)

    Under Armour, "Gisele Bündchen - I Will What I Want"
    Entrant: Droga5 New York
    Production Company: Smuggler New York
    (Bronze)

    Audi Of America, "The Scripted Life"
    Entrant: Venables Bell & Partners San Francisco
    Production Company: MJZ Los Angeles
    (Bronze)

    Taco Bell, "Routine Republic"
    Entrant: Deutsch LA
    Production Company: Arts & Sciences Los Angeles
    (Bronze)

    Weight Watchers, "My Butt"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: Skunk Los Angeles
    (Bronze)

    Nike, "Lebron James Together"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: HSI Productions Los Angeles
    (Bronze)

    GE, "The Boy Who Beeps"
    Entrant: BBDO New York
    Production Company: Park Pictures New York
    (Bronze)

    NFL, "Listen"
    Entrant: Chelsea Pictures New York / Grey New York
    Production Company: Chelsea Pictures New York
    (Bronze)

    Heinken USA/Newcastle Brown Ale, "Call For Brands"
    Entrant: Droga5 New York
    Production Company: Caviar Los Angeles
    (Bronze)

    Heinken USA/Newcastle Brown Ale, "Stephen Merchant Presents 'If We Won' With Newcastle Brown Ale"
    Entrant: Droga5 New York
    Production Company: Smuggler Los Angeles
    (Bronze)

    Nike, "Winner Stays"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: Rattling Stick London / The Mission Venice / Luma Pictures Santa Monica
    (Bronze)

    Microsoft, "The Collective Project"
    Entrant: Possible Seattle
    (Bronze)

    Jordan Brand, "Re2Pect"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy New York
    Production Company: Arts & Sciences Los Angeles
    (Bronze)

    Old Spice, "Drew Brees, Earl Thomas, Jamaal Charles"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
    Production Company: World War Seven Los Angeles
    (Bronze campaign)

    Land Rover USA, "The Wave"
    Entrant: Y&R New York
    Production Company: Helo Los Angeles / Go Big Productions Los Angeles
    (Bronze)

    Banplus, "Unforgettable Account"
    Entrant: FCB RG2 Caracas
    Production Company: Whiskey Films Caracas
    (Bronze)


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    Now that the 2015 Cannes Lions festival is over, we're going to spend a few days recapping some of the winners. We'll start with everyone's favorite—the Film and Film Craft winners. Check out all 23 spots below, and tell us your favorite.

     
    • Client: Leica Gallery São Paulo
    "100"
    Entrant: F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi São Paulo
    Production Company: Stink Sao Paulo
    Grand Prix in Film, two gold Lions in Film Craft

     
    • Client: John Lewis
    "Monty's Christmas"
    Entrant: adam&eveDDB London
    Production Company: Blink Productions London
    Grand Prix and gold Lion in Film Craft

     
    • Client: Geico
    "Unskippable: Family Long Form 01"
    Entrant: The Martin Agency, Richmond, Va.
    Production Company: Park Pictures New York
    Grand Prix in Film

     
    • Client: Atlantic Group
    "37 Days"
    Entrant: Leo Burnett France Paris
    Production Company: Quad Productions Clichy/La Cavalerie Montreal
    2 Gold Lions in Film Craft

     
    • Client: Unilever/Magnum
    "Proudly Seeking Pleasure"
    Entrant: Lola Lowe & Partners Madrid
    Production Company: Propaganda Producciones Madrid
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: Diageo/Guinness
    "Made Of Black"
    Entrant: AMV BBDO London/BBDO South Africa Johannesburg
    Production Company: Rogue London
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: Gatorade
    "Made In NY"
    Entrant: TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles
    Production Company: Smuggler Los Angeles
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: Old Spice
    "Dadsong"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy Portland Ore.
    Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: Nike Golf
    "Ripple"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy Portland Ore.
    Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks Los Angeles/Joint Editorial Portland/The Mill Los Angeles
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: Ikea
    "Beds"
    Entrant: Mother London
    Production Company: MJZ London
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: Procter & Gamble/Always
    "#LikeAGirl"
    Entrant: Leo Burnett Toronto, Chicago and London/Holler London
    Production Company: Chelsea Pictures Los Angeles
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: White House/Healthcare.gov
    "Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis: President Barack Obama"
    Entrant: Funny or Die Los Angeles
    Production Company:
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: Beats by Dr. Dre/Beats Solo2
    "The Game Before The Game"
    Entrant: R/GA London
    Production Company: The Sword Fight Los Angeles/Rock Paper Scissors Santa Monica/Brewster Parsons Los Angeles
    Gold Lion in Film

     
    • Client: Honda Motor Europe/Civic Type R
    "The Other Side"
    Entrant: Wieden + Kennedy London
    Production Company: Somesuch London/StinkDigital London
    Gold Lion in Film, two gold Lions in Film Craft
    Full experience here

     
    • Client: Sport England
    "This Girl Can"
    Entrant: Somesuch London/FCB Inferno London
    Production Company: Somesuch London
    Gold Lion in Film Craft

     
    • Client: Conservation International
    "The Ocean"
    Entrant: TBWA\Media Arts Lab Los Angeles/MAL For Good Los Angeles
    Production Company: @Radical.Media Santa Monica/Beacon Street Studios Los Angeles
    Gold Lion in Film Craft

     
    • Client: Samsung/ASP Surf Sponsorship, Samsung GS5
    "Every Day Is Day One"
    Entrant: 72andSunny Amsterdam
    Production Company: Smuggler London/Exit Films Melbourne
    Gold Lion in Film Craft

     
    • Client: Diageo/Buchanan's
    "Piano"
    Entrant: PapaMusic Buenos Aires/Santo Buenos Aires
    Production Company: Rebolucion Buenos Aires
    Gold Lion in Film Craft

     
    • Client: Mix Brazil Cultural And Diversity Association/22º Mix Brasil Festival of Culture and Diversity
    "Everyone Is Gay"
    Entrant: Neogama BBH São Paulo
    Production Company: Hungry Man São Paulo
    Gold Lion in Film Craft

     
    • Client: Audi RS3
    "Birth"
    Entrant: Mill+ London/BBH London
    Production Company: Mill+ London/The Mill London/The Mill Los Angeles
    Gold Lion in Film Craft

     
    • Client: Instituto Igarapé/Global Comission on Drug Policy
    "War on Drugo"
    Entrant: AlmapBBDO São Paulo
    Production Company:
    Gold Lion in Film Craft

     
    • Client: NTT Docomo
    "3-Second Cooking: Shrimp Frying Cannon," "3-Second Cooking: Super Fried Dumpling"
    Entrant: AOI PRO. Tokyo/Tokyu Agency Tokyo/NTT Advertising Tokyo
    Production Company: AOI PRO. Tokyo
    Gold Lion in Film Craft


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    Getting covered in mud is a big part of obstacle races like Warrior Dash. So, faucet company Delta set up a giant product demonstration after Saturday's event in Indiana—and claimed the Guinness World Record for most people showering simultaneously.

    Some 331 runners, including 1992 Olympic gold medalist and television personality Summer Sanders, helped Delta cinch the title in Crawfordsville. The previous record was apparently held by Thailand's 12Plus Shower Cream, which got 300 people wet at Dor-Shada Resort in Pattaya. (Yes, offbeat world records seem to exist primarily to add an air of legitimacy to marketing stunts.)



    The activation, part of Delta's "HappiMess" campaign, was created with help from sports marketing firm Revolution and media agency Spark. It's a pretty clever place for Delta to show up—but it's nowhere near as hard-core as Reebok bribing runners in another adventure race to get giant tattoos of its own triangle-shaped "delta" logo.

    All photos by Steven Mitchell/AP Images for Delta Faucet Company.


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    It's been a great week for acceptance of diversity. And now, Honey Maid continues that trend as we head toward Fourth of July weekend with a new ad that explores what it means to be American through the lens of a Dominican family of immigrants.

    The Mondelez graham cracker brand's "This Is Wholesome" campaign has celebrated same-sex, mixed race and blended families. This new spot from Droga5 takes the brand into multicultural territory, as we meet the Gomez family, who are celebrating Independence Day as American citizens.

    Arisandy, an environmental engineer, and Cindy, a realtor, show off their three children, and discuss the difficulties they've faced as a immigrant family—and also the deeply meaningful connection they have to the U.S., as we see them lighting sparklers, having a cookout and (product alert) grilling s'mores.



    The U.S.'s foreign-born population has grown by 31 percent in the past decade to 76 million people, or one-fifth of the total population, according to Honey Maid. Consumers are are encouraged to share their love for all families with the hashtags #MeltingPot and #ThisIsWholesome.

    "Honey Maid has a history of celebrating all families and the wholesome moments that make them who they are," said Gary Osifchin, portfolio lead for biscuits at Mondelez International. "The Gomezes embody the resonant strength behind America's blended and diverse culture. It is an honor to highlight their family's experiences and traditions this Fourth of July."

    CREDITS
    Client: Mondelēz International / Honey Maid
    Senior Director, Biscuits North America: Gary Osifchin
    Senior Brand Manager: Mikhail Chapnik
    Senior Associate Brand Manager: Jared Moran
    Agency: Droga5 NY
    Creative Chairman: David Droga
    Chief Creative Officer: Ted Royer
    Executive Creative Director: Kevin Brady
    Associate Creative Director: Tara Lawall
    Associate Creative Director: Devon Hong
    Copywriter: German Rivera Hudders
    Art Director: J.J. Kraft
    Chief Creation Officer: Sally-Ann Dale
    Head of Broadcast: Ben Davies
    Associate Broadcast Producer: Goldie Robbens
    Global Chief Strategy Officer: Jonny Bauer
    Group Strategy Director: Matt Springate
    Senior Communications Strategist: Taylor Hines
    Senior Social Strategist: Kat Popiel
    Social Media Manager: Rob Engelsman
    Data Strategy Director: Katty Lein
    Data Strategist: Annie Corbett
    Group Account Director: Brett Edgar
    Account Director: Amanda Chandler
    Account Manager: Jasmine McDavid
    Associate Account Manager: Amy Rosenberg
    Project Manager: Andra Johnson
    Production Company: Variable
    Director: Jonathan Bregel
    DOP: Stuart Winecoff
    Executive Producer: Tyler Ginter
    Producer: Alex Friedman
    Production Supervisor: Paige DeMarco
    Editorial: Variable
    Editor: Jonathan Bregel
    Co-Editor: Alex Moratto
    Executive Producer: Tyler Ginter
    Producer: Alex Friedman
    Postproduction: Nice Shoes
    Colorist: Sal Malfitano
    Flame Artist: Jason Farber
    Music: Music Bed
    Composer: Adam Taylor
    Sound: Defacto Sound
    Sound: Sonic Union
    Mixer: Rob McIver

    Public Relations Agency
    Weber Shandwick Worldwide
    Lauren Danis, Executive Vice President
    Michael Schiferl, Executive Vice President
    Caroline Lainio, Vice President
    Libby Tierney, Director
    Andrea Clift, Group Manager

    Media Buying Agency
    MediaVest
    Jamie Glastein, Associate Media Director
    Ridah Mannan, Connections Manager


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    Cannes Lions was born out of the Cannes Film Festival in the 1950s. And so, unsurprisingly, its origins were in narrative filmmaking—it awarded good commercials. Billboards weren't added until nearly 40 years later. And this, apparently, was considered such an act of heresy that only extensive deployment of the Heimlich maneuveron the Carlton Terrace prevented an entire generation of agency bosses from fatally choking on their fois gras.

    Over the following two decades, the festival evolved, along with our industry, into a sprawling, multi-headed hydra rewarding all types of communication. Except one.

    Shaun McIlrath

    Until recently, in common with pretty much every other ad festival in the world, Cannes did not reward innovation. Yes, it awarded innovative communication, but it didn't have a category for pure innovation.

    And yet, innovation is communication. For far too many years, our focus as communicators has been on speaking eloquently. But nothing is more eloquent, or more telling, than an organization's body language. The things we do say so much more about us than the things we say. Or, to put it another way, the amazingness of our actions is the best advertising we could ever create.

    The guys behind Cannes got this before any other ad festival, and three years ago they created the Innovation Lions. This year, innovation's importance was again underlined when they elevated its status further, creating Lions Innovation, a new festival within the festival.

    This festival is not just entered by agencies and brands, but by startups and tech companies. And, uniquely, shortlisted entries get to pitch in person to a jury made up of tech guys, VCs, media experts and yes, quaintly, even the odd agency creative.

    Now, I've sat on many juries over the years, but I've never experienced a process like this before. So, what did I learn?

    Well, first, convergence is real. While everyone on the jury had different backgrounds and viewpoints, everyone shared a common philosophy, which made the judging much easier and more fun. And what little jargon there was, was synced. Finally.

    I learned that guys who have been doing the rounds with VCs are a whole lot more buttoned-down and drilled than agency types. I was reminded that if you love your subject, and your subject is tech, it's very easy to get overinvolved in the intricacies and forget about real-life application. And I witnessed advertising stunts posing as business ideas fall apart under a cross-fire of questioning about IP, scaleability, etc.

    But at the root of all our questions were a few simple premises: Is it a breakthrough? Will it endure? Can it change lives?

    The standout ideas were pretty much all about innovation in the service of people and communities.

    Sure, it could be argued that the Talwar Bindi—a bindi that delivers a daily dose of iodine to Indian women, preventing birth defects—does not use a new technology. But in this case, the innovation was in the cultural application. Iodine supplements were either prohibitively expensive or simply weren't taken. But this elegant solution—to a problem affecting 9 million women—was relevant, cheap and used an existing behavior.

    Talwar Bindi, Life Saving Dot
    Entrant: Grey Group Singapore
    Singapore

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

    The BioRanger crop-testing device from Diagenetix is a hand-held biology lab designed to detect gene markers and give immediate feedback, making it five days faster than the conventional method of sending samples to labs. This enables farmers to manage blight implications there and then. Better still, data gathered can enable farmers to plot the spread of crop pathogens and, if necessary, prepare. It's a big idea, with huge implications for the agricultural industry—and that's before you start exploring potential applications for home-testing DNA in other areas.

    Diagenetix Bioranger
    Entrant: R/GA, New York

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

    ACH2O, in association with Panasonic, caused a lot of debate. In a nutshell, it filters the water created by your air conditioning unit into a drinkable product. It's such a simple idea that it was almost too easy to dismiss with a "Yeah, but do you really want to drink air-con water?" or "What about Legionnaires' Disease?" Big questions rooted in today. But put in the context of a future where by 2050, 40 percent of the world will suffer from water shortage, questions that need answered. Given that this could make your home or company water self-sufficient, it's a potentially enormous idea affecting millions. Imagine Vegas as a water self-sufficient city, all because it installed a new type of air-con unit.

    Panasonic, ACH2O
    Maruri Grey
    Guayaquil, Ecuador

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

    Luxottica's "Penny the Pirate" is a brilliant storybook and app that enables parents to screen their children's eyes at home. This turned a scary medical procedure into a warm educational experience for both the child and the parent. And honorable mentions go to Owlet Baby Care for their connected baby sock, which will relieve the anxieties of millions of parents, and Clever Buoy, which will save the lives of many swimmers.

    Luxottica, Penny The Pirate
    Entrant: Saatchi & Saatchi
    Sydney, Australia

    Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

    But there can be only one Grand Prix. And it was hotly debated.

    It's sometimes difficult for us to understand the implications of the fact that 75 percent of the world suffers from complicated, inconsistent or non-existent addressing systems. But it means that 4 billion people are effectively invisible. It means that in remote locations, water facilities can't be found, or fixed, schools and refugee camps cannot be precisely located and aid or assistance cannot be delivered.

    What3words is a universal addressing system designed on a 3-by-3-meter global grid. Each of the 57 trillion squares has been pre-allocated a unique three-word address, which is then turned into precise coordinates by a geocoder. It's more accurate than ZIP codes and, unlike longitudinal/latitudinal coordinates, so simple that it can be remembered by anyone and used by everyone. Businesses are adopting it, and communities like the favelas in Rio are already benefitting from it.

    3 Words To Address The World
    Entrant: What3Words
    London

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    It's a big, simple idea that doesn't just "address the world," it addresses the very real everyday problems of billions of people.

    And let's be honest, when was the last time an ad did that?

    —Shaun McIlrath is joint global creative director at Iris Worldwide


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    Giving people a new way to think and talk about cancer."

    That's the mission of three Internet films from New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, according to chief communications officer Avice Meehan. "We started to frame that language in the original work last fall," Meehan says, "and now we are bringing in the human impact by celebrating the stories of the people we serve."

    The films, running three to four minutes, each focusing on one cancer survivor's story, are the latest phase of MSK's "More science. Less fear" campaign. They were created by the New York office of Pereira & O'Dell, which introduced the campaign in September. That first phase included TV, print and outdoor ads featuring bright colors and positive message such as, "There will never be one cure for cancer. There will be millions."

    Now, the optimistic message continues.



    "My purpose in life is so big," says Valerie Hamilton, a teacher, mother of two, and one of the survivors we meet in the films. "My journey is not over … There were things that I felt I needed to accomplish."

    The other subjects echo these sentiments. Danny Soto, a firefighter in Hoboken, N.J., wants to continue serving his community, and Suzanne Kane, who receives her diagnosis four months before her wedding day, is determined to have a baby.

    "Everyone has a unique cancer journey," MSK's Meehan tells Adweek. "But in most cases, it is a journey that people have not been on before, and for which they are unprepared. Not knowing what to expect, or even what to do first, can make a patient feel a loss of control, which adds to the burden and fear that people are experiencing."

    Indeed, personal empowerment—the notion of helping patients overcome their initial fears and making them true partners in managing their treatment—is a theme throughout each of the films, as well as in TV, print and digital elements. "By developing personalized care plans and caring for each patient as a person with distinct concerns and needs, MSK can help patients regain some of this control," Meehan says.



    At the close of each story, the line "Science saves more than lives" flashes on screen, underscoring that MSK's expertise played a key role in allowing the subjects to realize their post-cancer dreams and aspirations.

    "Our vision for the 'Science Saves' films was to tell stories about people, not patients," and focus on their lives and achievements after they recovered, says Dave Arnold, executive creative director at Pereira & O'Dell.

    Director David Gelb, via production house Nonfiction Unlimited, delivers. The films serve up heartfelt, at times harrowing, but ultimately hopeful patient testimonials. The stories are never maudlin or overwrought. They skillfully balance honesty and optimism, packing considerable power.

    Ultimately, the campaign portrays cancer as an unwanted chapter that can be overcome with MSK's help, allowing folks to turn the page and continue writing the stories of their lives.



    CREDITS
    Client: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
    Agency: Pereira & O'Dell, New York
    Executive Creative Director: Dave Arnold
    Associate Creative Director: Jake Dubs
    Associate Creative Director: Alexei Beltrone
    Copywriter: Michelle Lamont
    Art Director: Alex Parodi
    Art Director: Lauren Geisler
    Managing Director: Cory Berger
    Group Account Director: Carey Cwieka
    Account Supervisor: Joelle Hadaya
    Account Executive: Jana Cudiamat
    Strategy Director: Mike Lewis
    Strategist: Anna Bedineishvili
    Head of Production, New York: Tennille Teague
    Senior Producer: Tamara Lecker
    Business Affairs Director: Russ Nadler
    Business Manager: Jaime Szefc

    Production
    Company: Nonfiction Unlimited
    Director: David Gelb
    Managing Director: Michael Degan
    Executive Producer: Loretta Jeneski
    Head of Production/Executive Producer: Patrick Degan
    Line Producer: Franny Freiberger
    Director of Photography: Maryse Alberti

    Editorial
    Company: Union Editorial
    Editors: Sloane Klevin, Karen Kourtessis
    Assistant Editor: Adriana Machado
    Executive Producer: Caryn MacLean
    Senior Producer: Susan Motamed
    GFX/title design: Jun Lee
    Producer: Yoko Lytle

    Animation (TV)
    Company: BUCK
    Creative Director: Orion Tait
    Executive Producer: Anne Skopas
    Producer: Ann Seymour
    Associate Creative Director: Daniel Oeffinger
    Design: Aaron Kemnitzer, Justin Lawes, Gareth O'Brien
    Animation: Wesley Ebelhar, Andreas Hansen, Aaron Kemnitzer, Justin Lawes, Enle Li, Gonzalo Menevichian
    Colorist: Jose Fuentes

    Music (TV)
    Company: Search Party
    Music Producer: Winslow Bright
    Composer: Nicholas Wright

    Audio (Films)
    Company: Heard City


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    With over 23 million Facebook video views in less than a week, this new ad from Kleenex is helping to make sure that the Kimberly-Clark brand's plot to keep America crying into its tissues is going deviously well.

    The latest video in the "Someone Needs One" campaign by VSA Partners was created by Vimby, and it combines dogs and disabilities—two of this year's successful Super Bowl ad themes. It's more than a tear-jerking testament to our love of a good cry. It's proof that Facebook is still a viral sharing force despite cluttered feeds and an algorithm that seems to block a lot of branded content.

    Vimby, working in partnership with VSA and Facebook, is creating all the online videos for the "Someone Needs One" campaign by leveraging its local documentary filmmaker network to collect the actual content. But the tale of an adorable dog who got a second chance at life by finding the perfect home has become a standout.



    Perhaps more interesting than the story of how yet another tear-jerking inspirational video went viral is the story in the comments. People who have adopted special-needs pets have been sharing pics of their own animals who got a second "Chance." It's one thing to be inspired, but it's another to be inspired to share your own story. It's that sort of word of mouth that gives this video its wow factor.

    So, give it a chance and see if you can keep from shedding a tear.

    CREDITS
    Client: Kleenex
    Agency: Vimby, Facebook Creative Shop
    Media Agency: Mindshare
    Kleenex Agency of Record: VSA
    Executive Creative Director: Adam Reno
    Producer: Carrie Stett
    Director of Photography: Ed Wu
    Production Company: Vimby
    Editor: David Rowe


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    We continue our 2015 Cannes Lions wrap-up today with a gallery of the Grand Prix and gold Lion winners in the Outdoor category. Only two of the campaigns were done by U.S. agencies, but TBWA\Media Arts Lab made it count by winning the Grand Prix for Apple. Also check out yesterday's gallery of the top Film and Film Craft winners.

     
    • Apple/iPhone 6
    World Gallery, Brendan O, Cielo D, Jirasak P, Cole R, Teppo K
    Agency: TBWA\Media Arts Lab Los Angeles/Apple Cupertino
    Grand Prix
    —Apple found photos it liked from 162 iPhone 6 users around the world and put them on billboards. In all, the campaign featured more than 10,000 installations in 73 cities in 25 countries. Apple called it "the largest mobile photography gallery in history."

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    • Unicef
    Fatty, Nerd
    Agency: Prolam Y&R Santiago, Chile
    2 Gold Lions
    —Kids aim their phones, firing squad style, at classmates in this anti-cyberbullying campaign from Chile. Copy reads: "One shot is enough. Cyberbullying represents one of the main causes of depression and suicide among kids at school. If you have a smartphone, use it wisely. Don't kill anyone's self-esteem. The work also won gold in Press.

     
    • Ecofill Ink Cartridges
    Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black
    Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Colombia Bogotá
    Gold Lion
    —This fun Colombian campaign illustrated the perils of printer ink running out with amusing scenes—one for each of the CMYK colors—showing people losing their clothes at the worst possible time.

     
    • Alghanim Motors - Honda/Honda Accord GPS
    Confusing Indian, Confusing Iranian, Confusing Arab
    Agency: Impact & Echo BBDO Safat, Kuwait
    Gold Lion
    —Built-in GPS technology with "voice guidance at every turn" informs these quirky ads from Kuwait, with locals giving directions with absurdly snaking arms.

     
    • News UK/Sunday Times
    Elton, Branson, Cowell
    Agency: Grey London
    Gold Lion
    —Elton John, Richard Branson and Simon Cowell are fat cats indeed in these ads promoting the British newspaper's "Rich List."

     
    • Abrinq Foundation - Save The Children
    B&W Dress, Blue Dress, Pullover, Sweater, Tunic
    Agency: Lew'Lara\TBWA São Paulo, Brazil
    Gold Lion
    —High-fashion clothes become a prison for children in developing countries in these striking Brazilian ads about child labor.

     
    • Millimed Thailand/Throatsil
    Alex, Ramsay, Tyler
    Agency: BBDO Proximity Bangkok, Thailand
    Gold Lion
    —Notable yellers Alex Ferguson, Gordon Ramsay and Mick Jagger appear, in curiously repeating form, in these Thai ads for throat lozenges.

     
    • KFC
    Drumstick, Burger, French Fries
    Agency: BBDO Proximity Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Gold Lion
    —Kids scream for food, and their mouths make the shapes of KFC menu items, in this Malaysian campaign.

     
    • 28 Too Many/FGM
    U.K., Sweden, Netherlands, Germany, Italy, Scotland
    Agency: Ogilvy & Mather London
    Gold Lion
    —This provocative campaign aimed to raise awareness that female genital mutilation (FGM) happens in Europe, not just in Africa and the Middle East.

     
    • No Somos Delito (We Are Not Crime)
    Holograms for Freedom
    Agency: DDB Madrid
    Gold Lion
    —Last December, Spain approved a "gag law" that limited Spanians freedom of protest. To protest it, while not breaking the law, this group organized the first-ever hologram protest.

     
    • Water for Africa
    The Marathon Walker
    Agency: Ogilvy Paris
    Gold Lion
    —At the Paris marathon in April, a Gambian woman named Siabatou Sanneh made headlines worldwide by walking the course with a 44-pound water container on her head—to raise awareness about the difficulties African women face in accessing clean drinking water.

     
    • Sport Clube Do Recife
    Security Moms
    Agency: Ogilvy São Paulo, Brazil
    Gold Lion
    —The rivalry between Brazilian soccer teams Sport Club do Recife and Náutico can often get violent. So, Recife came up with a great solution—training the mothers of fans to be security guards to keep an eye on their kids.

     
    • ZDK Gesellschaft Demokratische Kultur/Exit-Deutschland
    Nazis Against Nazis: Germany's Most Involuntary Charity Walk
    Agency: Grabarz & Partner Hamburg/GGH Lowe Hamburg
    Gold Lion
    —When a group of neo-Nazis arrived for a march in Wunsiedel, Germany, little did they know they'd be raising money to fight their own cause.

     
    • Samsung
    Safety Truck
    Agency: Leo Burnett Buenos Aires
    Gold Lion
    —In a country with a high car-accident fatality rate, Samsung designed a system for Samsung trucks that used a wireless camera in front and four outdoor monitors in back to let drivers behind the trucks better see the road ahead.

     
    • Women's Aid
    Look At Me
    Agency: WCRS London
    Gold Lion
    —This digital billboard uses facial recognition to recognize when people are paying attention to the image of a bruised woman. As more people looked at the ad, her bruises and cuts healed faster, communicating the benefit of not turning a blind eye to the problem.

     
    • Xiao Zhu/Air Purifier
    Breathe Again
    Agency: Y&R Shanghai
    Gold Lion
    —Xiao Zhu, a Chinese company that sells air purifiers, called attention to the country's pollution crisis by projecting the faces of crying children on the smoke coming from Chinese industrial plants.

     
    • States United to Prevent Gun Violence
    The Gun Shop
    Agency: Grey New York
    Gold Lion
    —Grey opened a real-looking gun store on the Lower East Side of Manhattan and invited first-time gun buyers to check it out, with hidden cameras rolling. The agency put disturbing tags on each weapon, indicating which models were used in particular mass shootings, unintentional shootings, homicides and suicides.

     
    • City of Buenos Aires/The Buenos Aires Public Bike System
    Dog, Baby
    Agency: The Community/La Comunidad Miami
    Gold Lion
    —"Never stop riding," said this eye-catching animated campaign promoting city bikes, with hunters on the back wheels chasing prey on the front wheels. The campaign also won the Grand Prix and two gold Lions in Press.


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    The title of Viacom Velocity's three-minute music video "The Fat Jewish Is Big Data Featuring Todrick as Hadoop" pretty much says it all. What don't you understand?

    Social media star/E! Channel interviewer Josh Ostrovsky—better known as "The Fat Jew," but just feeling vaguely Jew-ish here, I guess—stars as the burly, bearded, rapping personification of Big Data. Singer/dancer Todrick Hall, whose MTV docu-series drops in August, appears as the rapping personification of Hadoop, the open-source software framework.

    M.C. Python's in there too, also rapping, along with Kern Schireson, Viacom evp of data strategy and consumer intelligence, who keeps his mouth shut.

    Dat crew burns da mutha down! I think.

    At any rate, this extremely silly clip works hard to generate some laughs as it promotes the integrated marketing, branded content and insights unit of Viacom's ad sales operation, stressing, in cheeky hip-hop fashion, the ways in which Viacom Velocity employs data to solve clients' problems.



    Some lyrics: "I know you're struggling, I can feel your pain/Your profits they be falling, and circling the drain/You're selling beer to babies, diapers to teens/You barely even know what you customers need."

    Some more: "Maybe you should check what kind of data your usin'/And whether it illuminates what everybody is choosin'/for their cars, their clothes and telephonic devices/Yeah, that would be priceless."

    Niels Schuurmans, evp at Viacom Velocity, explains: "We thought rap worked perfectly as a way to infuse all the data jargon being thrown around, and a rap music-video parody was perfect coming from the company that made the music-video genre famous."

    The unit's gone the social-satire route before, producing a video earlier this year spoofing, and also analyzing, after a fashion, the social-influencer phenomenon. The primary target of the rap video "is mostly b-to-b, our agencies and client partners who understand, as we do, the importance of tapping Big Data to target fans and consumers across the media landscape," Schuurmans says. "We also wanted to create a b-to-b video that is entertaining enough to appeal a broader audience."

    They've succeeded as well as could be expected, given that rap parodies of anything, especially in the business and technology realm, feel a little old hat. Even so, Fat Jewish and Todrick deliver the goods with a zany energy that's hard to ignore.

    "They have substantial fan bases, and they're blowing up in social," Schuurmans says. "If you know them, it's a big win, and if you don't know them, it doesn't really matter because they're so great in the video. We consider it a coup that these social superstars agreed to partner with us on this creative."

    What say you, Fat Jewish?

    "Our schema is suprema, our analytics strong/Always aggregate, until our data's long/Got so many petabytes it makes a grown man cry/And you'll be making crazy bacon cause our Pig's so fly."

    CREDITS
    EVP/Viacom Velocity Creative: Niels Schuurmans 
    EVP/Viacom Velocity Integrated: Dario Spina
    VP/Viacom Velocity Creative Director: Beth Trentacoste
    VP/Viacom Velocity Social and Earned Media: Lydia Daly
    Sr Director, Production Management: Jeff Woodton
    Production Coordinator: Miriam Rattes
    Production Company: WW7
    Director: Cameron Harris
    Writers: Cameron Harris, Mike O'Connell, Beth Trentacoste, Niels Schuurmans
    Executive Producers: Brent Stoller, Beth Trentacoste, Niels Schuurmans
    Producer: Sheree Shu
    Director of Photography: Max Gutierrez
    Production Designer: John Flanagan
    Editor:  Josh Hegard
    Music: trusoundnewyork
    Composers: Paul Conte and Camus Celli

    EVP/Viacom Velocity Creative: Niels Schuurmans 
    EVP/Viacom Velocity Integrated: Dario Spina
    VP/Viacom Velocity Creative Director: Beth Trentacoste
    VP/Viacom Velocity Social and Earned Media: Lydia Daly
    Sr Director, Production Management: Jeff Woodton
    Production Coordinator: Miriam Rattes
    Production Company: WW7
    Director: Cameron Harris
    Writers: Cameron Harris, Mike O'Connell, Beth Trentacoste, Niels Schuurmans
    Executive Producers: Brent Stoller, Beth Trentacoste, Niels Schuurmans
    Producer: Sheree Shu
    Director of Photography: Max Gutierrez
    Production Designer: John Flanagan
    Editor:  Josh Hegard
    Music: trusoundnewyork
    Composers:  Paul Conte and Camus Celli


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    The Ad Council's "Love Has No Labels" campaign didn't just set records for the nonprofit PSA maker. With 110 million online views, the launch video is the second most watched social and community activism ad of all time, behind "Kony 2012."

    And across earned and social media, the campaign garnered more than 1 billion impressions in its first two months, the Ad Council says.

    There was plenty of love for the R/GA-produced work at last week's Cannes Lions festival, too. It won eight Lions—a record for an Ad Council campaign—picking up a gold and two silvers in Direct, a silver in Outdoor, a bronze in Titanium & Integrated and three more bronzes in Cyber (including one for spatial tech).

    The Ad Council got a chance to celebrate the Cannes success in the best way possible—by bringing the campaign to NYC Pride on Sunday, a day after the festivities wrapped up in Cannes. Check out the video below from Sunday's event, showing how the "Love Has No Labels" message has resonated with the LGBTQ community.



    "I continue to be inspired by how 'Love Has No Labels' has been embraced by people throughout the world," said Lisa Sherman, president and CEO of the Ad Council. "We're thrilled to be recognized by Cannes Lions and can't wait to continue to extend the unifying message that 'Love is love.' "

    Check out the original video below:


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    McDonald's won't just sate your hunger and comfort you when you're down. It will actually save your aborted love life.

    Or so claims a new U.K. ad from Leo Burnett London. The burger chain plays matchmaker, featuring a couple with basically no chemistry on what appears to be a first date. That is, at least, until the end, after they've parted ways unceremoniously and slunk off separately to grab a bite at McDonald's, where … well, you'll see.

    It's a nice thought for a brand that trades in tasty greasiness and the illusion of happiness. He's like a British Bradley Cooper. She's like a British Alison Brie. The tight scenes—a nonsense art gallery, a botched trip to the bowling lanes—contribute to the credible sense of awkwardness. And coincidences that might serve as ice(berg) breakers (sorry) could easily be mistaken for fate (especially because the relatively small menu seems to improve the odds of alignment).



    Unfortunately, the ending really is nothing but a deus ex (big) mac-hina (sorry, again). Given their social skills—or lack thereof—running into each other again would probably, in reality, just make the whole situation even worse.

    Are they really going to sit together at that point? How long can they talk about french fries and barbecue sauce, when they clearly have nothing else in common? Plus, even if it goes well, they're probably just replacing heartache with stomachaches. Then they'll have to say goodbye all over again—and it's highly doubtful either is carrying a breath mint.

    In all seriousness, though, it's a sweet story, especially if you like that fake strawberry flavor.


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    Here's a fun spot from earlier this year that picked up a silver Lion at Cannes last week. For S7 Airlines from Wieden + Kennedy Amsterdam, it features cute kids being themselves, namely by describing wonderful places or things they'd like to visit, but are also impossible … or so they think.

    Asked to let their imaginations run wild, the kids cook up with flight destinations that, if they had their way, would feature mammoths, mermaids, space rockets, giant sandpits, superheroes, dragons, wizards, bogeyman, a space kitty (Nyan Cat?) and subterranean cities. (It's not clear if she's thinking of Demolition Man, The Matrix or Twelve Monkeys, but she doesn't seem to have dystopian tendencies at all.) There would also be underground whales and, says the smartest kid by far, chocolate lakes.



    Relaying on the charming ad-libs of kids is a familiar trick, reminiscent of past ads like Wes Anderson's animated interview with an 8-year-old on the inner workings of a Sony smartphone (though it probably also owes a decent amount to the Fine Brothers "Kids React" series, as well).

    But the W+K sequence is exceptionally well edited, and features a twist that anchors it nicely in the brand. All the fantastical things and places—or approximations of them—actually do exist, if you allow some creative interpretation of reality.

    Sure, the ad's reach exceeds its grasp ever so slightly, and might particular bother literalist viewers. But it really does distill what the spirit of travel can be at its best—an eye-opening, awe-inspiring experience that unlocks natural and manmade wonders. And beyond the stunning landscapes, some of the translations are particularly spectacular—Space Kitty, it turns out, is actually a yak, and underground whales are geysers.

    In fact, the only real dubious one is that brown bubbling "chocolate" lake. If what you really want is fondue, you're better off staying home and dropping a few Hershey bars into a pot.


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    Believe it or not, there are a few situations where dressing up as a giant penis and spraying people with confetti is inappropriate. Promoting condom use on behalf of a sex education charity is one of those situations, according to thirtysomething Norwegians.

    To clarify, sex education charity RFSU hired ad agency Involve! to come up with something for a condom use campaign, which began as a response to rising chlamydia rates in Norway. Involve! then hired 19-year-old student Philip van Eck because he was tall enough to fit in the giant penis suit they'd built. Once properly fitted, Philip ran around spouting golden confetti at total strangers in service of the campaign's tagline, "Tiss kan overraske," which means "Penis can surprise you."

    If they'd set the ad to Da Vinci's Notebook's "Enormous Penis," it would have been perfect.



    Involve! meant for this to be cheeky and fun, and kind of gross, and they succeeded, but not across all audiences. Young people apparently loved it, but the over-30 crowd didn't like it one bit, and many of them called the stunt pointless and banal.

    Philip thought the whole thing was hilarious, because he's 19. But it wasn't without a few hiccups. "If I can do a good thing for others, just by being a dick, there is nothing better," Philip said. "The filming was not unproblematic, as passers-by wanted selfies with the giant penis. Suddenly, lots of people wanted to touch the penis and take pictures with the penis. I almost felt harassed."

    Have I mentioned how fortunate we are to live in this time?


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    A super-fast sneaker deserves a super-fast commercial, and Nike delivers one here for its Air Zoom Elite 8 running shoe. Blink and you'll miss it.

    The 60-second "Find Your Fast" spot—created by agency Must Be Something and directed by Chappelle Show c-creator Neal Brennan, who also did this fun campaign for Jordan Brand—features 13 all-star athletes getting their speed on. The larger "Find Your Fast" campaign challenges runners everywhere to log their fastest-ever mile by Aug. 30 through the Nike+ community.

    If the spot itself is fast, there's a spot-within-the-spot that's even faster—a quirky little old-timey diversion starring Kobe Bryant and the magician David Blaine.

    Check out the spot below, and the list of athletes below that.



    • Kobe Bryant: 5-time NBA champion (basketball)
    • Wayne Rooney: 3-time England player of the year (soccer)
    • Richard Sherman: Super Bowl champion (football)
    • Marlen Esparza: Olympic bronze Medalist (boxing)
    • Odell Beckam Jr.: Offensive rookie of the year (football)
    • Rafael Nadal: 14-Time Grand Slam champion (tennis)
    • Serena Williams: 20-Time Grand Slam champion (tennis)
    • Marcus Mariota: 2nd overall NFL draft pick (football)
    • Katarina Johnson Thompson: 2014 world No. 1, heptathlon (track and field)
    • Shane O'Neill: Pro Skater (skateboarding)
    • Mo Farah: Olympic Gold Medalist: 5,000M/10,000M (track and field)
    • Allyson Felix:  Olympic Gold Medalist: 200M/4x100M/4x400M (track and field)
    • Shelly-Anne Fraser-Pryce: Olympic gold medalist,100M (track and field)


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    Facebook has basically used the same logo since 2005—its name in white, in Klavika font, on a blue background. But this week, the company, which is now allegedly worth more than Walmart, decided to change its logo font, opting for a custom font designed in-house, according to Mashable

    Click the play button in this tweet to see the old and new logos overlaid on each other:

    The new typeface is an attempt to "modernize" the logo and make it appear more "friendly and approachable," says Josh Higgins, Facebook's creative director. Higgins also noted that Facebook explored many options but ultimately landed on updating its logo instead of redesigning it completely.

    So, what's different? The changes might be hard to spot until you focus on the "a" in the logo, which is now rounder and thinner. 

    It's definitely a subtle change, though not as subtle as Google's most recent logo tweak.

    What do you think? 


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    Duracell is making a strong play for the most American ad this Fourth of July by framing itself as the brand that helps keep members of the U.S. military connected to their young kids while deployed overseas.

    A new spot from Anomaly features a dad in uniform who uses Duracell's batteries to power a teddy bear that records his voice. He sends the gift to his young daughter back home, where she finds comfort in repeating the message, even when she's frustrated that her father can't be there in person.

    It's a powerful story about a difficult situation—generally well crafted with a couple of pointed twists and turns, if ultimately predictable in a satisfying kind of way. It's also reminiscent of what was arguably last year's best Independence Day commercial—Guinness's more understated paean to service.



    Ads that aggressively capitalize on servicemen and women can verge on feeling exploitative. After all, Duracell's main purpose here is to sell more batteries. Still, the brand deserves credit for recognizing soldiers, and the sacrifices of their families, when it could just have easily spotlighted more trivial fare.

    It helps that the ad is based in truth—Navy air traffic controller Robert Nilsson, his wife Denise and their daughters. It also helps that Duracell is donating $100,000 to the USO's Comfort Crew for Military Kids. (That sum isn't peanuts, but it's not eye-popping either. Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway is in the process of buying the battery company to the tune of $3 billion—but it's still owned by P&G.)

    The ad also encourages viewers to donate with a tag voiced by Hilary Swank, the daughter of a retired Air Force senior master sergeant.

    Regardless, it's a nice reminder that Duracell batteries are good for something more valuable than just sitting in the TV remote you don't use anymore because you watch everything online.


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    If you think rigorous scientific research is boring or self-serving, this short film from the Netherlands just might change your mind.

    Amsterdam-based agency 1Camera and director Hugo Keijzer employ some deft storytelling as they follow five scientists from different fields around the world, all working to improve people's lives in significant ways. Running more than four minutes, the film is the cornerstone of "Science Can Change the World," a new campaign from Royal Dutch DSM, a life and materials sciences company.

    The film, "Unsung Heroes of Sciences," will be shown at more than 50 events throughout the year, and has been seeded to blogs and uploaded to DSM's digital channels. The target audience is the scientific community, governments, NGOs and, perhaps most importantly, the general public.



    "People often think that science is there for the sake of science," says DSM global brand, digital and communications director Jos van Haastrecht. "We really would like to shift the perception to science for a societal purpose."

    To achieve that aim, the five scientists—selected from a list of 100 candidates—are shown in a mix of documentary footage and vignettes in which they recreate episodes based on their actually experience. Richard Little and Robert Irving of New Zealand design bionic legs for those who have lost limbs, while in Tanzania, Bart Knols develops an affordable way to fight malaria. Saumil Shah grows algae on Thailand rooftops as he strives to eradicate hunger, while San Francisco's Molly Morse converts methane gas into biodegradable plastics.

    Knols nails the overarching message when he says at one point, "This is not about research. This is about the lives of real people." Indeed, science isn't placed on some grand pedestal. Instead, we see complex, driven folks using their intellectual gifts to help others, and we gain insight into their motivations and the personal and professional hardships they strive to overcome.

    "Showing the real scientists in the film makes it all the more powerful, but also somewhat challenging since they had no acting experience," says 1Camera partner J.P. de Pont. "So getting these non-actors to act in their own story was a concern. However, because the struggles are such an everyday reality for these and most scientists, the emotion was already in them. And with the help of supporting actors, director Hugo and producer Ellen to make them feel comfortable, they performed great—at times, so great that it's easy to forget that they are not actors."

    Some of the scenes are hugely compelling, notably the segment where Amanda, a paraplegic, tries on Little and Irving's bionic legs and says, "It just felt like I got to reclaim a bit of me that's been lost." De Pont recalls, "When she stood up for the first time, the whole room, including the crew members, were fighting back their tears because of the sheer emotional impact." The crew knew they had captured "a beautiful moment that gave the most tangible proof that science can in fact change the world."

    One fictionalized scene, where Morse gets turned down for funding and tells a roomful of suits that "people like you are the reason our planet is going to hell!" veers into TV-movie territory. But it still works, because, for whatever reason, you don't expect a dedicated scientist to express frustration so strongly from the heart.

    Overall, we're treated to crisply edited, heartfelt filmmaking, with just enough dramatic tension to keep viewers involved and entertained.



    At times, the film resembles commercials from sneaker companies that show athletes going through their painstaking routines (running for miles at dawn, pumping iron, etc.) as they overcome adversity and emerge as winners.

    "We were inspired by the perseverance that scientists show in facing endless challenges, much like top athletes," says 1Camera creative director Jasper Claus. "But unlike top athletes, you'll probably never hear about these scientists, even though their work affects our daily lives and actually changes the world for the better."

    Thanks to this film, we're hearing about five of them now.

    CREDITS
    Film Production: "Unsung Heroes of Science"
    Client: Royal DSM N.V. (Angelique Paulussen, Jos van Haastrecht, Rob Dirix)
    Concept, Script: Jasper Claus, Hugo Keijzer
    Agency: 1Camera
    Creative Director: Jasper Claus (1Camera)
    Director: Hugo Keijzer
    Executive Producer: Paul Keur (1Camera)
    Production Partner: MikeTeevee
    Producers: Ellen Utrecht, Inge Zoete
    Director of Photography: Adam Scarth (Lux Artists)
    Art Direction: Marijn Molenaar
    Offline Editors: Annelien van Wijnbergen, Brian Ent (Kapsalon.tv)
    Colorist: Toby Tomkins
    Sound Studio: Kaiser Sound Amsterdam
    Music: Dead Man's Bones, "Lose Your Soul" (licensing: Pitch & Sync)
    Online: Glassworks Amsterdam


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    Michael William Lester, a London-based freelance designer and illustrator, isn't afraid to think small. We're talking minuscule here, people!

    Lester created "The World's Smallest Portfolio," a self-promotional piece that is 24 millimeters wide by 19 millimeters tall. That's barely the size of a postage stamp. The project originated as a brief from Jelly London for the D&AD New Blood Festival, challenging students to get people talking about their work.

    "They say the best ideas fit on a Post-it note," Lester tells AdFreak, "so I decided to take it a step further, seeing how little could tell the most."



    What was his work process like?

    "I had to be very selective, as the ideas had to be extremely sharp and quick to understand," Lester says. "I then ran about 100 print tests to get it right. I printed it on my little home printer, as I didn't want the quality to be that sharp, in order to get that nice ink-bleeding texture when magnified. I hand-bound it, packaged it and voilà."

    His itsy-bitsy book features art and single lines of copy on facing pages. For example, an eyeball-like rendering of the Brazilian flag is accompanied by the text "Monitoring the World Cup in Brazil," while an illustration of a reporter's notepad, its top sheet flapping like a cape in the wind, is captioned, "The reporter as a hero."



    Lester, who has done illustration work for IBM and U.K. charity Water for Africa, says he's bowled over by the reaction to his tiny portfolio. "The project has over 5,500 views on Behance, and 1,100-plus appreciations, as well as 70-plus comments. I really didn't expect it. It's been a bit crazy."

    It just goes to show that when it comes to building some buzz, size doesn't matter—as long as you've got a big enough idea.

    Via Design Taxi.


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    Mcgarrybowen Chicago's latest campaign for Triscuit, called "Makers of More," celebrates the brand's roots, and the simplicity of its recipe (wheat, oil and salt), by presenting the stories of five modern-day food entrepreneurs.

    The folksy foodies at McClure's Pickles, the Jam Stand, Olympia Provisions (they make sausages, mostly), the Savannah Bee Company (honey) and Wondermade (marshmallows) headline a series of online videos, TV spots, print ads and social-media posts. Each company shares its ingredients for success, and creates no-frills, tasty treats using the iconic cracker as a foundation.



    The work "is about sharing our heritage" and linking the classic brand, which dates back some 115 years, to present-day maker culture, Kristin Newitter, senior brand manager for Triscuit at Mondelez International, tells Adweek.

    "We have a fantastic product and wanted to unlock a new way for people to use it by repositioning Triscuit as a canvas that inspires food makers every day," adds Michael Straznickas, executive creative director at mcgarrybowen.

    There's an appealingly laid-back vibe that seems especially on brand. One of the McClures, describing how his family makes its spicy pickles, pretty much sums up the approach when he says: "It's really simple. It's nothing complex."

    Indeed, for these makers, and Triscuit, less is more, and that helps keep them on top.



    CREDITS
    Client: Mondelēz International (Triscuit)
    Agency: mcgarrybowen, Chicago
    Account Managing Director: Lindsey Clark
    Account Director: Amanda Janak
    Assistant Account Executive: Annabelle Reynolds
    Executive Creative Director: Dave Reger, Michael Straznickas
    Associate Creative Director (Copy): Rob Neveau
    Associate Creative Director (Art): Ryan Carter
    Executive Planning Director: Shawna Ross
    Digital Strategist: Kevin Kovanich


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